"While there are requirements that I push myself to meet, this isn't a pressure-cooker environment."

"One thing that's unfavorable is when candidates list something on their resume and can't articulate anything about it."

John Kuster, hiring committee cochair 

Sidley Austin LLP


This mighty Chicago firm has an ever-expanding roster of offices at home and abroad, but its "Midwestern attitude" isn't compromised.

"IT'S been a very exciting year for us," says Sidley Austin's management committee member Anne Rea"Our strategy is to have a significant presence in the major commercial and financial centers of the world and we have been expanding and growing, which is always exciting for law students." It appears that 'downsizing' or 'consolidation' are not words in this Midwest megafirm's vocabulary. "In 2009, in the depths of the financial crisis, we opened our Palo Alto office," Rea tells us. "When many firms were retrenching, we were expanding." Growth continued with the opening of the energy-focused Houston office in 2012 and the securities-driven Boston outpost in 2013. Sidley further bolstered its ranks last year with two significant lateral groups: 11 securities enforcement partners switched over from Bingham McCutchen in April, while eight Weil, Gotshal partners (including seven women) took up residence in SA's Dallas office in September.

Associates Say

The Work 

Newcomers to Sidley "don't just come in as a generalists and progressively find a specialty. After receiving an offer you fill out a form indicating your three practice group preferences and also how much you want to go there. They're pretty good at adhering to people's choices and help direct your specialization in a meaningful way from the outset." Litigators, for example, might immediately be shipped off to the employment, IP or antitrust subsets. Corporate attorneys could find themselves immersed in M&A, real estate transactions or global finance. However, "nothing is written in blood. If you're unhappy you can change groups, or if another team needs help you can do work elsewhere." Anyone arriving in DC should bear in mind you will almost certainly go into litigation, which is the office's primary focus.

"You're helped to get on a few cases when you first get here," but work assignment, especially on smaller teams, is generally "very informal. There's a handful of partners and senior associates I usually work with so I keep in touch with them and see what they have in the pipeline, or I might get a phone call out of the blue." But "group leaders still keep track of what is being assigned so no-one gets overloaded."

"Sidley is a traditional large firm with more associates to partners so the level of responsibility is not overloaded at the start and progresses as you get more senior," sources agreed. Therefore, a third-year litigator in Chicago told us, "there was certainly doc review involved early on but now I have more experience I can draft things from start to finish – critical motions, witness scripts and depositions, for example." On the transactional side, we heard that "if something is brand new to you then of course the seniors are heavily relied upon as you're breaking ground. However, once I was able to prove myself I've been given the opportunity to handle aspects of a deal, draft the main operative documents and have a good deal of client interaction."

Regulatory work is big in DC and associates in this arena said "our practice has a lot of research and analysis assignments so from the very beginning you're asked to conduct that and put forth your findings in written form. There's a lot of complicated, ambiguous issues so it can be a struggle to get up to speed and the learning curve is high, but everybody is very willing to talk things through with you and answer questions. Because of that you're expected to just jump in and give it a go, which means you never feel like you're held back." In the firm's smaller offices and less heavily staffed practices, associates can expect even quicker progression.

Training & Development 

Sidley offers a "robust and solid" training program. Firm orientation sees all new associates descend on Chicago for an "intensive bootcamp," which is later expanded upon for mid-levels. Transactional first-years from across the network also spend a few days in the Big Apple or Windy City for Corporate College, while a litigation skills series caters for different year groups. In addition, there are plenty of practice area-specific trainings, CLE sessions, and "writing or oral workshops where consultants offer guidance." Many of the training sessions are video-conferenced, allowing associates in the non-host office to benefit equally.

Despite this multitude of opportunities, sources emphasized that on-the-job training is the most beneficial: "Most of my training and experience comes from the people I'm working with," said one. "Anyone is willing to help you learn." Another remarked: "I've gained the most from being on a deal and having the partner teach me about a specific aspect one-on-one. Formal training is more general."

Offices 

The Chicago HQ is impressively full-service –"it has a good reputation for everything!" – and has over 500 attorneys. The office is located in the heart of the City's 'Loop' business district, making it easily accessible for anyone commuting in. Associates also appreciate being "within two blocks of both State and Federal Court. It's so convenient, especially when the weather turns cold."

With more than 350 lawyers in total, the Midtown NYC office is an adept operator in the corporate arena and houses the largest portion of the firm's capital markets practice. A substantial litigation group of roughly 80 attorneys is also present. The DC office opened just over 50 years ago and is Sidley's third-largest. Its K Street location, "just two blocks from the White House," reflects its position at the crossroad of law and policy. The firm's US roster is completed by three offices in California (LA, Palo Alto and San Fran), two in Texas (Dallas and Houston) and the baby of the bunch, Boston, which opened in 2013. 

Culture 

Despite spreading its wings far beyond its Chicago roots, this is a firm where "the Midwestern attitude still comes through." In what ways? "There's no yelling or unreasonable deadlines," answered a second-year. "If you have to work at the weekend people are apologetic. There's respect for your personal time as Sidley wants you to be a happy and productive worker. While there are requirements that I push myself to meet, this isn't a pressure-cooker environment."

Even the traditionally tougher North East markets display Sidley's affable charm. "It has a reputation for its Midwest feel," reflected a DC rookie, "and that's largely true in the sense that people aren't high-strung here for the sake of it. Everyone wants to get the work done to the highest caliber and move about their business. Being a screamer is not a badge of honor." In the Big Apple: "Even though we're located in New York there's a Midwest, Chicago-type vibe. The work is demanding and hard but there's an appreciation from the higher ranks of what we put in. It's not an intimidating atmosphere."

With such an amenable working environment, it is perhaps a little surprising that Sidley does not boast one of the more active social scenes in BigLaw. "If there is a downside to our culture it is that it's not easy to make friends with everyone," commented a Chicagoan. "There are some people I'm close with but not that many I could go out and grab a beer with." A source in LA offered their perspective on why: "It's not a fratty place; it's a family-friendly firm – most people would rather get home than go out. We will do happy hours every two weeks but there's no pressure to go."

Hours & Compensation 

Sidley doesn't issue a formal statement on billable targets, but associates generally agreed that for a salary increase they should hit 1,800 billable hours a year, with 2,000 hours (which can include pro bono once 1,800 billable is breached) making you bonus eligible. These benchmarks aren't troublesome for most associates, but "there would be no big ramifications" should you fall short: "For the first two years, especially in specialized groups, you do a lot of practice development to get up to speed so it is understood, not taboo, if you don't make it."

Pro Bono 

Associates believe Sidley to be "very committed to pro bono." A Chi-Town junior commented: "In my view I have unlimited opportunities. If I wanted to do something I could get it set up in a day. It's one of the hallmarks of working here." Pro bono coordinators will also circulate matters juniors can get involved with. The firm has many "longstanding relationships with nonprofits" in each of its locations, and our sources had worked with the ACLU in California and Illinois. Time was also lent to immigration, veteran and death penalty cases, with the latter particularly focused on Alabama. Other pro bono work included doing 501(c)(3) applications for chartered organizations.

Pro bono hours 

  • For all attorneys across all US offices: 117,029
  • Average per US attorney: 70.3

Diversity 

Diversity is "something Sidley takes seriously but something it is still constantly working on." Consensus told us that "there are plenty of women here, but there is still an interest in seeing more become partners." Similarly, "there is a lot of room to improve in terms of ethnic minorities. There are very few Latino/Hispanic partners or African Americans." However, this is considered "not just Sidley's problem, but a law firm problem in general."

To help address any shortcomings the firm operates a Diversity Committee, a Committee on Retention and Promotion of Women, numerous pipeline programs, such as the Sidney Prelaw Scholar Initiative, and a Diversity and Inclusion Scholarship, which offers deserving 2Ls $20,000 upon joining the firm's summer program. The firm also operates an outreach program targeting minority and LGBT affinity groups on campus.

Get Hired 

"In terms of background, most people are from one of the best law schools in the country and did pretty well," a third-year told us. "Even those not at the top law schools were top of their law school class. A lot of lawyers here also participated on law journals or undertook clerkships." This is a firm where strong academic pedigrees are the norm and that's reflected in the personalities of the workforce: "I am impressed by the intelligence of the people I work with," postured a second-year. "You can be discussing a deal and they can immediately recall a precedent matter from four years ago that matches perfectly with it."

Cochair of Sidley's hiring committee, John Kuster, looks for candidates with "a strong sense of self, confidence and enthusiasm. Not just for Sidley, but for the practice of law. They should also demonstrate a commitment to excellence that we can objectively see, so we can tell they will be a good fit for us." Thus, in line with the associate's view above, law journal and clerking experience are highly valued: "We are very interested in students who are actively pursuing an interest in the law as this will be their life's work," says Kuster. "If their extracurriculars are consistent with a commitment to the law, that is certainly attractive." A failure to show dedication to high standards is therefore a surefire way to come across poorly: "One thing that's unfavorable is when candidates list something on their resume and can't articulate anything about it," explains Kuster. "If you include something on your resume, be prepared to speak about it. It’s always better and we'll be interested in learning more about you."

Strategy & Future 

"We are one of the largest law firms in the world and believe we are in the very top tier in terms of quality," declares management committee member Anne Rea. Sidley's recent track record tells you that it's always on the lookout for the next chance to flex some muscle. Not that size is everything: "We have strategic priorities that include expansion but we don’t expand for the sake of it," says Rea. "We do it if there are lawyers or locations that our clients would benefit from."

The firm is primarily focused on "deepening and strengthening" its expertise: "We want to increase our presence in key industries and practices that will drive the legal business," Rea explains. The demand for energy was cited as the "key motivation for opening in Houston," while the technology hub of Palo Alto will be another key area in the years to come. "Technology drives innovation, and innovation is the hallmark of the value the US contributes to the world," Rea remarks. "Capitalizing on that is something that will position us well for decades."



 


Key Facts

Largest US office: Chicago

US offices: 9

International offices: 10

First-year salary: $160,000

Billable hours: undisclosed

Summers 2014: 111 (106 2Ls, 4 1Ls, 1 3L)

Revenue 2013: $1.6 billion (+7.4%)

Partners made in 2014: 24 (21 US)

Chambers USA Rankings

    Band 1
  • Appellate Law
    ( Nationwide )
  • Banking & Finance
    ( Illinois )
  • Capital Markets
    ( Nationwide )
  • Climate Change
    ( Nationwide )
  • Corporate/M&A
    ( Illinois, New York )
  • Environment
    ( District of Columbia, Illinois, Nationwide )
  • Financial Services Regulation
    ( Nationwide )
  • Insurance
    ( Illinois, Nationwide )
  • Intellectual Property
    ( Illinois )
  • International Trade
    ( Nationwide )
  • Investment Funds
    ( Nationwide )
  • Litigation
    ( Illinois )
  • Media & Entertainment
    ( Illinois )
  • Products Liability
    ( Nationwide )
  • Real Estate
    ( Illinois )
  • Transportation
    ( Nationwide )
  • Band 2
  • Antitrust
    ( Illinois )
  • Bankruptcy/Restructuring
    ( California, Illinois )
  • Communications
    ( Illinois )
  • Energy & Natural Resources
    ( Illinois, Nationwide )
  • ERISA Litigation
    ( Nationwide )
  • Healthcare
    ( District of Columbia )
  • Labor & Employment
    ( Illinois )
  • Life Sciences
    ( Nationwide )
  • Privacy & Data Security
    ( Nationwide )
  • REITs
    ( Nationwide )
  • Securities
    ( Nationwide )
  • Tax
    ( Illinois )
  • Band 3
  • International Arbitration
    ( Nationwide )
  • Leisure & Hospitality
    ( Nationwide )
  • Technology
    ( Illinois )
  • Telecommunications
    ( District of Columbia )
  • Wealth Management
    ( Nationwide )
  • Band 4
  • Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation
    ( Nationwide )
  • Projects
    ( Nationwide )
  • Band 5
  • Latin American Investment
    ( New York )

For each practice area, only the firm’s best ranking (with location) is shown. Any lower rankings (in other locations) are not shown. To see full rankings

Diversity

Partners (%)Associates (%)
Women22.244.9
White91.475.6
Black/African American1.53.7
Hispanic/Latin American1.54
Asian4.813.5
Mixed/Other0.83.2
LGBT2.63.7

Recent Work Highlights 

  • Represented Lone Star Funds in its acquisition of Royal Park Investments' assets for $8.7 billion
  • Represented Singapore sovereign wealth fund GIC, an investor consortium member, in the acquisition of BMC Software for $6.9 billion
  • Represented JPMorgan Chase Bank in connection with $2 billion senior secured multicurrency credit facilities to Microchip Technology
  • Represented Microsoft in a series of high-profile cases against Motorola involving Microsoft’s assertion of patents against Android-based smartphones
  • Represented Apple in a patent infringement action brought by Smart Phone Concepts